A very satisfying, action-packed, yet sad conclusion to WandaVision

The final episode of the phenomenon known as WandaVision was indeed satisfying, at least to this Marvel fanboy. We finally got to see Wanda develop fully—in name and appearance—into the Marvel Comics character she was intended to be...the Scarlet Witch. Wanda finds out she is more than a Sokovian orphan experimented on and given powers by evil men playing with an Infinity Stone; she is a witch, and a very powerful one, even more powerful than the Sorceror Supreme himself, Steven Strange.


Agatha Harkness turned out to be the Big Bad of the series, deliciously played by Kathryn Hahn. Hahn goes Full Witch Mode, in flowing robes, wild hair, extreme makeup, cackling and levitating as much as possible. The powerfully dangerous book she had in her basement was the Darkhold, which we have seen in Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., and was most likely the critical book missing from the library in the Doctor Strange movie. She knows from that book what Wanda really is, and reveals to her what she is capable of. Like many villains, Agatha loves to monologue, and one too many teaching moments leads to her eventual downfall.


Agatha is a manipulator and will say anything to get Wanda to give up her powers to her. She reveals what Wanda has done to the citizens of Westview. The guilt of the pain and suffering she has put them through makes Wanda release them from her control and open the Hex to let them out. This moment of emotional realization could have been crushing for Wanda, but she shows how strong she is and deals with it.


When White Vision and SWORD's forces storm though the gap in the Hex to attack, Wanda, Hex Vision, and the twins join forces to tackle them all. Wanda trusts the boys' abilities enough to leave them to deal with SWORD while she takes on Agatha in an epic aerial battle, with hexbolts flying everywhere. Wanda seems to miss more than she hits...or does she?


Wanda's final transformation into her true self is breathtaking and a geeky thrill

The two Visions square off in their own epic battle, which ends very quickly and logically. Almost humorously so. The result of their confrontation could lead to a Wanda and Vision reunion, perhaps in the next Avengers movie. But for now, the restored White Vision inexplicably flies off instead of helping with the remaining battles.


A very logical conclusion to the battle of the Visions

Agatha gets a punishment she deserves. Is it mercy, or torture?


This series has been about dealing with grief. And the danger of how a supremely powerful being deals with it. In Wanda's case, she was stuck in the Denial stage of Grief, and created a fantasy world where she could escape reality rather than deal with it. By the end of episode 9, Wanda has finally reached the Acceptance stage. She again shows her immense strength when she realizes and knows that the Vision and her twins won't survive outside the Hex. Saying goodbye to your children, even if you've only known them for the relatively short time Wanda has, is shattering. Wanda dealt with it better than I thought she would. In the comics, when Wanda was made to realize her twin boys weren't real, but were her magical creations, she had an episode much like she had in WandaVision, remaking reality in an explosion of grief.

We have Marvel producer Kevin Feige to thank for WandaVision's vintage sitcom approach; the man is a major fan of the sitcom genre and that was the foundation of the series for the writers to build the show around. WandaVision was weird, it was different, it was mysterious, beautiful to look at, and fun to watch. The best What-The-Heck-Is-Happening-Here tv event since LOST. And like LOST, it was a phenomenon that got the internet buzzing.

Wanda watches as her Vision dies...again.

Scroll down to see SPOILERS & THEORIES

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Agatha was THE Big Bad after all. No Mephisto, no Nightmare, no A.I.M. infiltrating SWORD. Simpler turned out to be better. Just a power-hungry, evil witch.


The twins weren't real. Sadly, this one was expected, foretold by the twins' first appearance in Marvel Comics. There, they were a figment of Wanda's imagination, brought to live with chaos magic, along with a little help from Mephisto. In WandaVision they were just as much a magical creation as Vision turned out to be.


Where did White Vision go? When White Vision and Hex Vision had their meeting of the minds, White disappeared with no explanation. Why didn't he stick around to help? And why didn't Hex Vision tell Wanda that he gave White his memories back, and they could be together again? Not seeing Wanda and the real Vision reunite was a disappointment. But the farewell between Wanda and Hex Vision sure was romantic, wasn't it?


Wanda has learned to astral project. In the last credits scene, Wanda is in a Far East cottage, and we see her astral self studying the Darkhold. Chances are, after she left Westview, the first place she went was to seek out the Sorceror Supreme for guidance. Steven Strange no doubt taught Wanda this trick to help her learn magic faster, as he did.


PLOT HOLES

When Woo and Rambeau first arrived at Westview, local police said there was NO SUCH PLACE as Westview on the map...they had never heard of it. As Wanda removes the hex dome, the town of Westview remains, along with the citizens, and the sign at the town limits. So the place obviously did exist before Wanda arrived and transformed it.


If the real Vision was in SWORD labs, then how was Hayward able to track the Hex Vision? He shouldn't have been able to track anyone inside the Hex anyway.


Why was Agatha so insistent that Wanda have children? At least one entire episode revolved around this push. Was it to prove Wanda had the power and ability to create two beings from scratch?


DISAPPOINTMENTS

The whole Faux Pietro thing. Marvel had a chance to do something truly cosmic and epic, by bringing the Pietro from the X-Men universe into the MCU and literally transforming the MCU in an instant. Making him a lame actor named Ralph was an epic fail, IMO.


Not getting to see Monica make a proper splash with her new powers. Passively absorbing a few bullets was all we got to see.



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