Shadowman #7 REVIEW: great, poetic narration and stunning art in this silent, full blown war issue


Written by: Cullen Bunn, Art by: Pedro Andreo, Colours by: Jordie Bellaire.


Jack Boniface is a musician from New Orleans. He has a power passed down through his lineage, through a voodoo spirit called Shadow Loa. He is one of only a few people who can protect the Earth against the evils from the Deadside (another realm). His alter ego gives him reduced fear, enhanced strength, endurance, and reflexes, as well as other voodoo powers. He is….Shadowman.


The war is raging and the veil is gone, and Shadowman is having a crisis of faith. He thought he was a priest, not a warrior. His allies are losing confidence in him, and he’s not sure if he can fight a god. Gods are immortal, gods don’t bleed, and that’s what they need; if they can make her bleed then it’s her confidence that will be tested. But when you’re fighting something that’s not a creature of hell, but Hell itself, well then the team will need all the help they can get.


Another month and another stunning issue from the creative team. There’s so much to like about this from both the art style and the script. Bunn again has heightened the intensity with a full scale war issue. Set to commentary by Jack as he details events that happened during the war, there’s no dialogue within the issue at all. This works to its advantage as there's no to and fro between characters to distract you from the detailed art and Jack's voiceover.


The sense of doom that is constant through the issue is managed by great writing and some excellent artwork. Bunn shows how comfortable he is weaving a story with no dialogue, and yet continues to have a wonderful script displaying heightened emotions. Every sentence is filled with dread and despair yet is also beautifully poetic. “Desperate we fight….against Hopelessness against inevitability”. . . the impending doom in each sentence just makes the whole issue that much more gut-wrenching as with each panel you feel less hope.


What makes this issue so good though, is the combination of great writing and stunning art. Even in an action-packed issue, we still have the elements that are key to this series: horror. Each of the blights looks disgusting, as they should be. What I also love about the art is how the emotions are conveyed. We get close-ups of Shadowman and he looks desperate, with facial expressions of a broken individual, and the body language to match. Another interesting thing that drew my eye, was the panel layout throughout the issue. It starts relatively normal (who’s to say what "normal" actually is, but it’s more traditional when it comes to panel borders, each having their own designated space), however as we get into the book and the war gets more intense, the panels become more sporadic not being equal, overlapping each other. This chaos adds to the ferociousness of the war by keeping the reader on edge.


The last thing that I loved about this issue was the cameos from other Valiant heroes. I’m still relatively new to the universe and although I’ve read many of their characters in solo series, this was the first time I’ve seen them cross over, which just added extra depth to the world.


Overall, it was a very enjoyable issue and I’m really looking forward to the conclusion to see where the character can go from here. He’s still my favourite of the Valiant universe and I’m excited to see more.


Shadowman issue 7 was released by Valiant Entertainment on 16th March from your Local Comic Shop as well as comixology


 

Andrew Carr was blessed to grow up watching the animated series of Batman, X-Men, and his favorite, Spider-Man.This started his dive into the comics world, which resulted in meeting his amazing cosplaying wife Imogen. They live in England with their Sinister Six dogs.

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