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Two Graves #3 COMIC REVIEW: the truth starts to become unearthed as Death reveals his past.


Written by: Genevieve Valentine, Art by: Ming Doyle and Annie Wu, Colours by: Lee Loughridge, Letters by: Aditya Bidikar.

 

Emilia is still being tracked by the hunters. Death continues his job to retrieve people, using Emilia as much as he can to interact with the living, while it’s still possible. He’s feeling guilty about everything he’s done. He’s not a nice person and yet he’s all she has, and he’s determined to help her with her mum's last wish. They both know they have to keep moving; time is running out and he knows that the hunters will eventually find them . . . he knows them . . . they’ll find them.



I am truly in awe of this series. I started it with no expectations at all and I’m blown away by how incredible the writing is. Genevieve Valentine manages to keep the mystery to the “death” character. I call him that but he seems more like a grim reaper, helping those that have died to pass on. It’s the mystery of what happened between him and Emilia that makes this book so intriguing. Although it’s not just their relationship that’s compelling me to stay with this series, it’s the complexity of the smoke man, “Death”. He’s still a mysterious character with a dark history although he still comes across as likeable. He seems like he has this moral part to him, and that’s the reason why he’s helping Emilia.

 

The writing is great where in a single issue not much can happen to further the plot, but the characters are developed. As much as Emilia is the main character and we do feel for the struggle that she’s going through, despite not fully understanding it. Is she dead or has Death accidentally taken her soul away so her physical form is there but she’s slowly dying? This would explain how she’s able to interact with people but also why she’s the companion of the grim reaper. The smoke man still steals the book for me. The complexity of his character shows how talented Genevieve is as a writer.

 


The visuals of the book are incredible. Ming Doyle and Annie Wu have done a phenomenal job with this, from the art to the panel payout. There’s so many examples I could have picked to feature here, as this book had an abundance of fantastic panels.

 

I settled on these, the first showing Death and Emilia walking down a path facing away from us. The second is Death looking out of a window down a long secluded path. These two images I felt represented the series, both characters have a long road to walk with their character development, it’s something that they are doing together for now but they will end up going separate ways. The fact that in the first panel they were facing away almost symbolises the fact that they have turned their back on the past, looking forward to this journey they are on.

 

Something else that I really loved about the book was the way historic moments are portrayed. When it’s told by Death, it’s clouded in smoke as if it’s coming from the characters head himself, but also symbolising that these are in the past, and just like smoke, they fade away.

 

Overall, this series is going from strength to strength. We are only 3 issues in and I love how complex the characters are. As much as the journey is intriguing, it’s the characters that are the focal point for me. They are well written, fleshed out characters who have interesting motivations. The art definitely helps too, with it matching the book perfectly. A couple of very small flaws in the art are nothing to bring down the score dramatically so it’s another 4 POPs out of 5 for this book, keeping up the consistent high quality entertainment.

 


Two Graves issue 3 was released on 11th January from Image Comics, available at your Local Comic Shop as well as comixology


 

Andrew Carr was blessed to grow up watching the animated series of Batman, X-Men, and his favorite, Spider-Man.This started his dive into the comics world, which resulted in meeting his amazing cosplaying wife Imogen. They live in England with their Sinister Six dogs.

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