WandaVision: an entertaining, internet-busting tv series, full of nostalgia and mystery

Updated: Jan 26


Since Avengers: Endgame, it’s been a long wait until we got some follow-up stories about the Avengers (Spider-Man movies not included). With its LOST-level “What the heck is going on here?” intrigue, WandaVision is worth the wait. The internet is buzzing with theories, and it’s fun to see so many people get excited about it. It’s difficult to say much about these episodes without getting into juicy speculation, so we will do our best to review episodes, placing any details and theories at the bottom of each article, with plenty of empty space to scroll through to avoid seeing spoilers.


Wanda and Vision as Laura and Rob Petrie

Each episode of WandaVision takes place in different era of classic American tv sitcoms. Each episode’s set features a familiar sitcom home; episode one had the look and feel of The Dick Van Dyke Show, with a near-perfect vibe of the Petrie household. The second looked like the Stevens' Bewitched home. The third is influenced by The Brady Bunch home, complete with open stairway and shag carpet. Opening credits, animations, and music all faithfully mimic each era’s sitcom inspiration. There are even period tv commercials inserted into breaks in the drama, dropping their own WTH moments. Everything visual about this series is top-notch and it’s apparent that budget has not been an issue. No expense has been spared.


The Brady Bunch-inspired home from episode 3

The storyline seems to borrow heavily from popular Marvel plots, specifically the sitcom-style existence the two share (in the recent miniseries The Visions), as well as the birth of Wanda’s twins. More on that in the Theory section below.

Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany both seem to be having a blast playing Wanda and Vision. They each get to show their excellent comedic chops, and are highly watchable and entertaining. It’s a very tight half-hour format, and it’s obvious everything that happens and every word everyone says is important, so it’s riveting. You can’t take your eyes off the screen for fear of missing something.

Even if you aren’t familiar with the source material, and haven’t got a clue what is going on, these episodes are still a lot of fun to watch. Each is written, shot, and edited to mimic each era’s tv show. The silly plots, the nosy neighbors who barge in and won't leave, the laugh track, etc. There are lots of weird teases from every character that Wanda and Vision meet that they know more than they let on. They may be frustrating for some, but they sure do make you want to watch next week to find out more!


After a pregnancy that lasted less than a week, Wanda has twins.

Wanda's contractions are in indicator of how uncontrollable her powers can be when she is distraught.

You can watch WandaVision on Disney Plus. Episodes one and two were released together, with a new episode following each Friday. The series is planned to run for nine episodes.


RECOMMENDED READING:

Avengers Disassembled (2004)

House of M (2005)

The Visions (2016)



Ok, Theories & Details section below…final warning…scroll down

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WHAT’S GOING ON HERE?

It’s highly probable by the series title itself, WandaVision, that these episodes are seen through Wanda’s eyes, and are a virtual, and perhaps even real, world of her creation, inspired by the Western sitcoms she watched on tv in her youth (her "WestView"). In the comics, Wanda had the ability to rewrite reality to her liking, whether it was erasing all mutants from existence in a fit of madness, or subconscious wish fulfillment by creating her own twins, which couldn’t possibly have been conceived naturally with her synthetic husband.

In Avengers: Infinity War, Vision was killed by Thanos. Could Wanda have been so overcome with grief that she created this perfect little pocket universe in which she and Vision, and their twins, could live happily ever after?

If so, why is S.W.O.R.D., a counterpart of S.H.I.E.L.D., monitoring Wanda’s visions, and even inserting agents (like Geraldine, who is actually Monica Rambeau, last seen as a child in Captain Marvel) into her pocket world? And why is Wanda seeing a beekeeper, a thinly veiled reference to the uniforms of the goons from A.I.M., a scientific-based crime organization. And why would an A.I.M. goon be wearing a S.W.O.R.D. logo on his uniform? Even the regular use of hexagons suggest this is all a self-contained hive of Wanda’s making, or at the very least, another A.I.M. beekeeper reference.



Wanda finally realizes Geraldine is not who she says she is.

It’s been made very clear that just about everyone Wanda and Vision meet in their pocket world knows more than they are letting on, and some are desperate to tell them everything. But, as we discovered in the comics, shocking Wanda out of her dream world can have consequences for the entire world, if she rewrites all of reality to suit her, in a fit of rage or grief. Perhaps everyone is just trying to ease her out of her mourning. Wanda seems very resistant to their efforts, when anything is said or done that threatens to bust her bubble. Several times, she has “rewound” the scene to make it play out more favorably, or to erase something she doesn’t want to see or hear.


Even the commercials are weird hints at what might be going on. With the exception of the Stark Industries toaster (itself an approximation of Vision’s head, and a Battlestar Galactica reference to Cylons/robots), all ads so far have featured products made by various crime orgs in the MCU. Curiouser and curiouser.


Episode 4 promises to reveal what is really going on, so stay tuned!



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